MY THOUGHTS ON CO-INSTRUCTING

I’m going to use this post as a declaration to put more effort into developing my ability to co-teach. This post is for all the other instructors out there that hate teaching alongside someone. I’m hoping it will give you some options on how to better yourself as a leader and co-instructor.

LET’S TALK ABOUT TANTRUMS

Swimmers are beginning to form opinions about what they like and what they don’t, they’re giving their parents a hard time about getting in the water, or they’re just coming in with expectations that cause them to breakdown. Tantrums are part of the package when working with children so let’s take a moment to discuss how these breakdowns can be handled by both instructors and parents.

HOW TO TEACH SAFE JUMPING

We want to instill this idea of asking about safety before taking action around any body of water. By encouraging them to ask this question, we’re teaching our swimmers that they must be accompanied by someone who can answer the question and to acknowledge that they can’t simply jump without checking for specific signs that could potentially cause harm to them or those around them.

THE TRUTH ABOUT SECONDARY DROWNING

Secondary drowning is a harrowing phrase swimming through the interweb that describes children drowning while on dry land after they’ve been out of the water for at least several hours. For the sake of all vacations everywhere, and our children’s continued love for the water, I want to set the record straight.

INSTRUCTORS, LETS SWITCH THINGS UP

after teaching the same class for months at a time without any shift in pace, things start to feel monotonous and tiresome. I know this all too well as I’ve been working at a summer camp with the same kids, teaching the same skills everyday for months. I’m bored and it’s time for a shift.